Calendar
ALL SHOWS ARE PERFORMED AT THE MONTE CARLO OPERA
January 2023
Friday
20 January
19 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
Alcina
Haendel
Sunday
22 January
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Alcina
Haendel
Tuesday
24 January
19 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
Alcina
Haendel
Wednesday
25 January
20 H

Choral concert
Subscription Galas
Stabat Mater
Rossini
Thursday
26 January
19 H

Opera
Alcina
Haendel
February 2023
Sunday
19 February
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Andrea Chénier
Giordano
Tuesday
21 February
20 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
Andrea Chénier
Giordano
Thursday
23 February
20 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
Andrea Chénier
Giordano
Saturday
25 February
20 H

Opera
Andrea Chénier
Giordano
March 2023
Friday
10 March
20 H

Recital
Subscription Soirées
Daniel Barenboim
Friday
17 March
20 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
La traviata
Verdi
Sunday
19 March
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
La traviata
Verdi
Monday
20 March
20 H

Opera by the Vienna Staatsoper
Subscription Galas
Le nozze di Figaro
Mozart
Tuesday
21 March
20 H

Opera
La traviata
Verdi
Thursday
23 March
20 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
La traviata
Verdi
April 2023
Sunday
16 April
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Il barbiere di Siviglia
Rossini
Monday
17 April
20 H

Puppet opera
Subscription Soirées
L’Orfeo
Monteverdi
Tuesday
18 April
20 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
Il barbiere di Siviglia
Rossini
Thursday
20 April
20 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
Il barbiere di Siviglia
Rossini
Saturday
22 April
20 H

Opera
Il barbiere di Siviglia
Rossini
Recital
Daniel Barenboim
10 March 2023
Recital
Piano Daniel Barenboim

Daniel Barenboim

Recital
Friday 10 March 2023 - 20 h
Opéra de Monte-Carlo

Piano Daniel Barenboim

Born in Buenos Aires of Jewish parents of Russian origin, raised in Israel from 1950 onwards, then a student in Paris, a concert pianist since the age of seven and an inter- nationally acclaimed conductor for 60 years now, also an ardent defender of human rights, Daniel Barenboim is a true citizen of the world whose artistic ventures are as varied as his cultural influences.

He has accompanied the greatest performers with a firm hand and, as a pianist, has worked under the musical direction of such legendary conductors as Otto Klemperer and Sir John Barbirolli. Equally at ease in the intimate world of chamber music and as a conductor of imposing Wagnerian operas, he has also had a profound impact on the recording industry since the 1960s, thanks to such essential releases as the complete Beethoven piano concertos or the Mozart and Schubert sonatas.

A few months after celebrating his 80th birthday, Daniel Barenboim will perform on the stage of the Monte Carlo Opera, thus sealing the friendship and artistic complicity that binds him to its new director, Cecilia Bartoli.

Production team
Piano | Daniel Barenboim
A few words with…

Daniel Barenboim

How do you feel about performing at the Salle Garnier in Monte Carlo, and is it your first time?

I first played in Monte Carlo in the 1970s, and I look forward to returning there every time.

 

Can you describe your acquaintance with Cecilia Bartoli? 

I have known Cecilia for many, many years and admired her from the beginning. It is common knowledge that my wife pulled me out of the bath to go and watch this fascinating young Italian mezzo-soprano who was replacing someone in a Maria Callas-gala on French television. She was already a champion of Rossini then, Mozart followed a little later. I particularly love her marvellous voice, her spontaneity and her sense of humour.

 

To be a musician is your first profession, and at the same time you have been artistic director or general manager of major orchestras and opera houses for many years. Do you have any advice for Cecilia?

In all the years of her career Cecilia Bartoli gained a lot of experience. She knows how to stand at the helm of an institution and how to inspire. There is always a risk that administrative tasks crowd out the music. Our job is to defend the musical aspect and bring music forward. Since she is such a great artist, Cecilia will do well.

 

Do you already have an idea of what you will play at your recital in Monte Carlo?

No… !

 

What are the challenges of playing a keyboard instrument like the piano?

My father was virtually my only teacher, and he attached great importance to my growing up with Bach’s keyboard music. For him polyphonic music-making was simply one of the most important issues concerning everything relating to piano-playing. Unlike a violin or an oboe, the piano cannot seduce by virtue of its sound alone. It is a neutral instrument, and the art of playing it involves a sleight of hand. The music can only be of interest if the different strands of the polyphonic texture can all be heard and create a three-dimensional effect –just as in painting, where something is moved into the foreground and something else into the background, making one appear closer to the viewer than the other, although the painting is flat and one-dimensional.

 

If you find some free time during your stay in Monte Carlo, what would you like to do?

Spend it with Cecilia if she is there.