Calendar
ALL SHOWS ARE PERFORMED AT THE MONTE CARLO OPERA except those in November
November 2023
Thursday
02 November
20 H

Choral concert
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Subscription Soirées
Messa da requiem
Verdi
Sunday
19 November
19 H (by invitation from the Palais)

Staged Concert
Caruso à Monaco
Wednesday
22 November
20 H

Opera
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Don Carlo
Verdi
Friday
24 November
20 H

Opera
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Don Carlo
Verdi
Sunday
26 November
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Don Carlo
Verdi
December 2023
Saturday
16 December
20 H (Gala)

Musical
Subscription Galas
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Sunday
17 December
15 H

Musical
Subscription Matinées
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Tuesday
19 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Wednesday
20 December
20 H

Musical
Subscription Soirées
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Thursday
21 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Friday
22 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Friday
22 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Saturday
23 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Saturday
23 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Monday
25 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Tuesday
26 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Tuesday
26 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Wednesday
27 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Wednesday
27 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Friday
29 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Friday
29 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Saturday
30 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Saturday
30 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Sunday
31 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Sunday
31 December
20 H (masquerade night)

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
January 2024
Wednesday
24 January
19 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Haendel
Friday
26 January
19 H

Opera
Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Haendel
Sunday
28 January
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Haendel
Monday
29 January
20 H

Choral concert
Subscription Galas
Ein deutsches Requiem
Brahms
Tuesday
30 January
19 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Haendel
February 2024
Friday
23 February
20 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
Cavalleria rusticana & Gianni Schicchi
Mascagni & Puccini
Saturday
24 February
20 H

Aria Recital
Subscription Soirées
Rolando Villazón
Sunday
25 February
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Cavalleria rusticana & Gianni Schicchi
Mascagni & Puccini
Tuesday
27 February
20 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
Cavalleria rusticana & Gianni Schicchi
Mascagni & Puccini
Thursday
29 February
20 H

Opera
Cavalleria rusticana & Gianni Schicchi
Mascagni & Puccini
March 2024
Saturday
23 March
17 H

Recital
Cecilia Bartoli & Lang Lang
Sunday
24 March
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
La Fille du régiment
Donizetti
Tuesday
26 March
20 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
La Fille du régiment
Donizetti
Thursday
28 March
20 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
La Fille du régiment
Donizetti
Saturday
30 March
20 H

Opera
La Fille du régiment
Donizetti
April 2024
Sunday
07 April
19 H

Staged Concert
Subscription Galas
Their Master’s Voice
Malkovich - Bartoli
Monteverdi L'Orfeo 17 April 2023 Puppet opera
Conductor Gianluca Capuano
Directors Franco Citterio and Giovanni Schiavolin

Monteverdi L’Orfeo

Puppet opera
Monday 17 April 2023 - 20 h
Opéra de Monte-Carlo

Favola in musica in five acts
Music by Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643) 
Libretto by Alessandro Striggio
Premiere: Mantua, Court Theatre, 24 February 1607

Premiere at the Monte-Carlo Opera

New production Associazione Grupporiani Carlo Colla & Figli, Comune di Milano – Teatro Convenzionato

Going back to the beginnings of the history of opera and having its most emblematic work performed for the first time on the stage of the Monte Carlo Opera must be realised in an unexpected way. Thanks to the two-hundred-year-old Milanese puppet company Carlo Colla & Figli, heir to the purest Italian tradition, L’Orfeo, created in 1607, will appear for the first time in Monte Carlo in a form that will appeal to the most demanding music lovers, as well as the youngest spectators. Gianluca Capuano conducts the Musiciens du Prince as well as a fine cast particularly well-versed in the arcanum of early music. Placed in the pit, they lend the string puppets their voices, whereas the action on stage evolves in an antique carousel of painted canvases, animated by an army of puppeteers, hidden in the half-light, with an incredible precision and delicacy. This way of presenting an opera is a true enchantment; it is takes us back to our childhood dreams and is capable of spellbinding a large audience.

Team production
Conductor | Gianluca Capuano
Director, sets and costumes | Franco Citterio
Director | Giovanni Schiavolin
Costumes | Cecilia di Marco
Costumes | Maria Grazia Citterio
Stage Master | Luca Volontè
Puppeteers | FRANCO CITTERIO, MARIA GRAZIA CITTERIO, PIERO CORBELLA, CAMILLO COSULICH, DEBORA COVIELLO, CARLO DECIO, VERONICA LATTUADA, MICHELA MANTAGAZZA, CECILIA DI MARCO, TIZIANO MARCOLEGIO, PIETRO MONTI, GIOVANNI SCHIAVOLIN, PAOLO SETTE
Cast
Orfeo | Renato Dolcini
La Musica / Euridice | Carlotta Colombo
La Messaggera / La Speranza | Sara Mingardo
Plutone / Pastore 4 / Spirito 3 / Eco | Marco Saccardin
Caronte | Salvo Vitale
Apollo / Pastore 2 / Spirito 1 | Massimo Altieri
Pastore 3 / Spirito 2 | Massimo Lombardi
Proserpina | Elena Carzaniga
Ninfa | Francesca Cassinari
Pastore 1 | Jacopo Facchini
VOCAL ENSEMBLE IL CANTO DI ORFEO
LES MUSICIENS DU PRINCE – MONACO
Artists' biographies
Artistic and technical teams

LES MAÎTRES D’ŒUVRE

Direction musicale
Gianluca Capuano

Mise en scène, décors et costumes
Franco Citterio

Mise en scène
Giovanni Schiavolin

Costumes
Cecilia di Marco
Maria Grazia Citterio

Maître de scène
Luca Volontè

Marionnettistes 
Franco Citterio
Maria Grazia Citterio
Piero Corbella
Camillo Cosulich
Debora Coviello
Carlo Decio
Veronica Lattuada
Michela Mantagazza
Cecilia Di Marco
Tiziano Marcolegio
Pietro Monti
Giovanni Schiavolin
Paolo Sette

SOLISTES

Orfeo
Renato Dolcini

La Musica / Euridice
Carlotta Colombo

La Messaggera / La Speranza
Sara Mingardo

Plutone / Pastore 4 / Spirito 3 / Eco 
Marco Saccardin

Caronte
Salvo Vitale

Apollo / Pastore 2 / Spirito 1
Massimo Altieri

Pastore 3 / Spirito 2
Massimo Lombardi

Proserpina
Elena Carzaniga

Ninfa
Francesca Cassinari

Pastore 1
Jacopo Facchini

ENSEMBLE VOCAL IL CANTO DI ORFEO

Maria Dalia  Albertini
Laura  Andreini
Alessandro Baudino
Giulia Beatini
Paolo Borgonovo
Elena Carzaniga
Francesca Cassinari
Paola Cialdella
Cesare Costamagna
Maurizio Matteo Dalena
Jacopo Facchini
Stefano Gambarino
Pietro Gus
Caterina Iora
Massimo Lombardi
Annalisa Mazzoni
Arianna Miceli
Dario Previato
Luca Scaccabarozzi
Yiannis Vassilakis
Piermarco Vinas

LES MUSICIENS DU PRINCE – MONACO

Violon I
Thibault Noally

Violon II
Nicolas Mazzoleni

Altos
Diego Mecca (leader)
Emanuele Marcante

Viole de gambe
Cristiano Contadin

Violoncelles
Antonio Carlo Papetti

Contrebasses
Roberto Fernández De Larrinoa

Théorbe / Guitare / Luth
Miguel Rincon Rpdriguez
Elisa La Marca

Flûtes 
Jeong-guk Lee (leader)
Hugo Rodriguez Arteaga

Trompettes
Thibaud Robinne (leader)
Sebastian Schärr

Trombones
Seth Quistad
Marco Rodrigues
Billie Thomas
Daniel Vesel
Andrea Calcagno

Cornets 
Gebhard David
Martin Bolterauer

Harpe
Marta Graziolino

Clavecin / Orgue / Régale
Gianluca Capuano
Davide Pozzi

Percussions
Paolo Nocentini

PERSONNEL DE SCENE

Directeur de scène
Xavier Laforge

Régisseur principal
Elisabetta Acella

Régisseur sur-titrage
Sarah Caussé

Régisseur d'orchestre
Nicolas Payen

Directeur technique
Vincent Payen

Responsable du bureau d’études
Nicola Schmid

Chef machiniste
Carlos Grenier
Olivier Kinoo

Techniciens de plateau
Tom Ayrault
Guillaume Bricout
Axel Gbedo
Laurent Riviere
Fabrice Ruozzi
Stéphane Souici

Chef électricien
Benoît Vigan

Pupitreurs
Dylan Castori
Grégory Masse

Responsable audio/vidéo
Benjamin Grunler

Chef costumière-habilleuse
Eliane Mezzanotte

Chef costumière-habilleuse adjointe
Emilie Bouneau

Habilleurs
Christian Calviera
Edwige Galli
Karinne Martin
Lauriane Senet
Véronique Tetu

Responsable billetterie
Virginie Hautot

Responsable adjointe billetterie
Jenna Brethenoux

Service billetterie
Ophélie Balasse
Dima Khabout
Stéphanie Laurent

A few words with Gianluca Capuano

Gianluca Capuano

Could you describe the significance of Les Musiciens du Prince – Monaco and your work with them?

For a conductor the opportunity to work regularly with a specific orchestra, moreover an orchestra where the players are hand-picked by ourselves and their number may be modified to suit the repertoire in question, is an absolute privilege. I have an instrument at hand which is utterly flexible and meets the highest standards when turning our esthetical principles into reality. I am proud to think that with Cecilia Bartoli and Les Musiciens du Prince we are adding an important chapter to the history of musical performance, especially with regard to Handel, Mozart, Gluck or Rossini.
Much work has already been done by baroque ensembles. Very few of them, however, work in such a systematic way and at such a high level in the field of 19th century opera, in particular Italian melodramma. There is still a great amount of apprehension about the use of period instruments in this repertoire. Yet, by using gut strings or period wind instruments the singing becomes marvellously intelligible, the words find a perfect correspondence in the articulation of the instruments, the stage and the pit enter into a dialogue rather than rivalry.

 

With our new Monteverdiproduction you venture into the 17th century for the first time?

In 2023, we will play the piece which marks the point of origin of the entire history of opera: Monteverdi’s Orfeo. Actually, I passed my entire “first life” studying and performing Italian 17th century music, so nothing new for myself. But I am most delighted to collaborate with the Colla string-puppet company again and to involve Les Musiciens du Prince in this project. I am eagerly looking forward to the moment when I may share my insights regarding Monterverdi’s music with them.

 

How and when did you meet Cecilia Bartoli?

Meeting Cecilia Bartoli was a watershed in my career. First, I worked with her as a continuo player and choir master, and from 2016 as conductor for all her projects. To learn from an artist of this calibre, but also to develop projects together is absolutely unique. We share a passion for musicological research and for music theatre, and the great energy which goes into everything we do.

 

A thought about Cecilia’s new function as a theatre director?

It will leave its mark on time.

Synopsis

The action takes place in the fields of Thrace (Acts I, II and V) and the Underworld (Acts III and IV).

Prologue

The score opens with an instrumental toccata (a sort of fanfare played three times). It precedes the entrance of La Musica, representing the “spirit of music”, who sings an aria in five stanzas where she makes the list of her talents. In particular she reminds us of how the hero Orpheus achieves all kinds of exploits thanks to his power, succeeding notably in “making Hades bow down to his prayers”.

 

Act I

A shepherd rejoices: Orpheus is going to wed his beloved Eurydice (“In questo lieto e fortunato giorno”). The chorus of nymphs and shepherds responds to him in a stately invocation to the god of marriage, Hymenaeus (“Vieni, Imeneo, deh, vieni”), and then in a joyful dance (“Lasciate i monti”). Orpheus speaks to the sun, “rose of the sky”: has it ever seen a lover more filled with joy than he? He then turns to Eurydice and sings his love for her in his sweetest voice (“Rosa del ciel, vita del mondo”). Eurydice responds with the same emotion (“Io non diro qual sia”). The couple make their way to the temple, while the nymphs and shepherds resume their songs and dances.

 

Act II

Orpheus returns to his beloved fields and forests, rejoicing with the shepherds and chorus over the happiness he now feels (“Ecco pur ch’a voi ritorno”). He muses on his former unhappiness that made even stones weep (“Vi ricorda, o bosch’ombrosi”). This joyful atmosphere ends with the arrival of the nymph Silvia, the Messenger, bringing news that will pierce Orpheus’s heart (“Ahi caso acerbo”). Orpheus forces her to reveal this misfortune (“D’onde vieni? Ove vai? Ninfa, che porti?”). Silvia tells him what has happened: while gathering flowers Eurydice received a deadly snakebite (“In un fiorito prato”). They all express their grief and incredulity. Orpheus announces his intention to descend into the Underworld to persuade Pluto to resuscitate Eurydice (“Tu se’ morta, mia vita, ed io respiro?”). The Messenger castigates herself for bearing such bad news, and announces that she will flee to a lonely cavern (“Ma io, che in questa lingua”). The chorus express their fear of remaining alone, without Silvia, Orpheus and Eurydice, and pay a fitting homage to the deceased (“Chi ne consola, ahi lassi?”).

 

Act III

Orpheus is guided by Speranza (Hope) to the gates of Hades (“Scorto da te, mio Nume Speranza”). After reading the inscription over the entrance (“Abandon hope, all ye who enter here”), Speranza leaves. (“Ecco l’atra palude”). Thus, Orpheus loses his last remaining support, his final solace (“Dove, ah, dove ten vai”). He must now confront the ferryman Charon, but he refuses to ferry him across the river Styx (“O tu ch’innanzi morte a queste rive”). Orpheus attempts to persuade Charon by singing a flattering song to him and trying to arouse his pity (“Possente spirto”), but his efforts are in vain (“Ben mi lusinga alquanto”). His second attempt is successful: Orpheus plays his lyre and lulls Charon into a deep sleep (“Ahi, sventurato amante / Ei dorme, e la mia cetra”). Orpheus steals his boat and crosses the Styx, then enters the Underworld. A chorus of spirits reflects on the fact that nature is defenceless against man’s determination (“Nulla impresa per uom si tenta invano”).

 

Act IV

Charmed by Orpheus’s voice, Proserpina, the Queen of Hades, begs her husband Pluto to bring Eurydice back to life (“Signor, quell’infelice”). The King of Hades agrees, but on one condition: when leading Eurydice back to the world Orpheus must never look back, as that would condemn her to return to Hades for ever (“Benché severo ed immutabil fato”). Orpheus appears, followed by his wife. He sings his thanks to his lyre for accomplishing this exploit (“Qual onor di te fia degno”). On the way back, however, a doubt creeps into his mind: what if Pluto has betrayed him? He looks back and the image of Eurydice slowly begins to fade (“Ahi, vista troppo dolce e troppo amara”). Orpheus tries to follow her, but he is drawn back by a mysterious force. The chorus of spirits sings Orpheus’s sad fate. He had overcome Pluto, but has now been overcome by him (“È la virtute un raggio”).

 

Act V

Back in the fields of Thrace, Orpheus deplores the loss of Eurydice and decides that his heart will never again be pierced by Cupid’s arrow. The nymph Echo repeats off-stage the final notes of each stanza (“Questi i campi di Tracia”). Suddenly, in a cloud, Apollo descends from the heavens and chastises his son for giving in to despair and lamentations (“Perché a lo sdegno e al dolor in preda”). He invites Orpheus to leave the world of humans and join him in the heavens where he will recognise Eurydice’s likeness in the stars. Considering that it would be unworthy not to follow such generous counsel, Orpheus follows his father to the heavens. The chorus of shepherds rejoices that their hero has found eternal happiness, and the opera ends with a vigorous moresca.

 

Claire Delamarche, translated by Mary McCabe © Opéra de Monte-Carlo 2023

L’Orfeo, director's notes

L’Orfeo
Music by Claudio Monteverdi
Libretto by Alessandro Striggio

 

Director’s notes

Since the beginning of the 20th century the Compagnia Carlo Colla & Figli’s puppets have produced shows based on subjects drawn from the grand operas of the 19th century, in particular Verdi’s operas. Hence, their repertoire included operas such as Aida, Attila, Nabucco, Macbeth, La forza del destino, La battaglia di Legnano, as well as  Crispino e la Comare, Robert le diable, Il matrimonio segreto and even Mefistofele or Il Guarany. After being housed temporarily by major opera houses, the Compagnia’s first permanent location was for five years at the Teatro San Giovanni in Parma. They then moved to Milan, where for over fifty years, from 1906 to 1957, they performed at the Teatro Gerolamo of Piazza Beccaria.

At first the puppets simply interpreted on stage the dramas related in the opera librettos. Gradually, however, the small wooden actors began to portray the musical dimension of the different characters as well, acting like real opera singers.

Over the years the Compagnia has broadened its repertoire to include composers such as Falla with Master Peter’s Puppet Show, Satie with Geneviève de Brabant, Mozart with Il sogno di Scipione, Haydn with Philemon und Bauci (winner of the Abbiati Award), Handel with Rinaldo, Giustino and Ariodante, Rossini with L’italiana in Algeri, and even Melani with Il girello and Monteverdi with Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda and Il ballo delle ingrate.

And now the puppets are taking on that quintessential “musical fable”: L’Orfeo, the work in which, thanks to the “recitar cantando” (speaking in song), the purity of the music, combined with the passion of the poetry, is consecrated in the leading character’s way of singing.

But why puppets? Because, by merging and detaching themselves under the eyes of the spectator, they form metaphors capable of evoking the emotions of the human being without replacing him; because the world of puppets brings to the stage the multicoloured visions of fictitious environments and spaces that can conjure up in the spectator’s imagination an infinity of fantastical possibilities; because their movements chant times and rhythms that are drastically removed from reality and destined to complement one another in a game of reminiscences and magic. Also because the origins of puppet theatre, and in particular of the Compagnia Carlo Colla & Figli, go back to the grand tradition of Baroque theatre, where the illusion of perspective, the stage effects and the desire for enchantment and “wonderment” are the primary elements on which, even today, stage productions depend.

Thus, in a sort of visual and emotional carrousel, dozens of wooden characters evolve between allegory and reality, against painted backdrops that reproduce the serenity of pastoral decors as well as the horrors of the depths of Hades, attaining the delights of the Olympian realm, and accompanied by Monteverdi melodies that, between the initial “Toccata” and the final “Moresca”, sublimate those moments of spatiotemporal suspension which are specific to our small world, a world attached to strings.

Compagnia Marionettistica Carlo Colla & Figli
Produzione Associazione Grupporiani
Translation Opéra de Monte-Carlo