Calendar
ALL SHOWS ARE PERFORMED AT THE MONTE CARLO OPERA except those in November
November 2023
Thursday
02 November
20 H

Choral concert
Subscription Galas
Subscription Soirées
Messa da requiem
Verdi
Sunday
19 November
19 H (by invitation from the Palais)

Staged Concert
Caruso à Monaco
Wednesday
22 November
20 H

Opera
Subscription Galas
Don Carlo
Verdi
Friday
24 November
20 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
Don Carlo
Verdi
Sunday
26 November
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Don Carlo
Verdi
December 2023
Saturday
16 December
20 H (Gala)

Musical
Subscription Galas
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Sunday
17 December
15 H

Musical
Subscription Matinées
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Tuesday
19 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Wednesday
20 December
20 H

Musical
Subscription Soirées
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Thursday
21 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Friday
22 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Friday
22 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Saturday
23 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Saturday
23 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Monday
25 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Tuesday
26 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Tuesday
26 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Wednesday
27 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Wednesday
27 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Friday
29 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Friday
29 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Saturday
30 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Saturday
30 December
20 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Sunday
31 December
15 H

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
Sunday
31 December
20 H (masquerade night)

Musical
The Phantom of the Opera
Lloyd Webber
January 2024
Wednesday
24 January
19 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Haendel
Friday
26 January
19 H

Opera
Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Haendel
Sunday
28 January
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Haendel
Monday
29 January
20 H

Choral concert
Subscription Galas
Ein deutsches Requiem
Brahms
Tuesday
30 January
19 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Haendel
February 2024
Friday
23 February
20 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
Cavalleria rusticana & Gianni Schicchi
Mascagni & Puccini
Saturday
24 February
20 H

Aria Recital
Subscription Soirées
Rolando Villazón
Sunday
25 February
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
Cavalleria rusticana & Gianni Schicchi
Mascagni & Puccini
Tuesday
27 February
20 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
Cavalleria rusticana & Gianni Schicchi
Mascagni & Puccini
Thursday
29 February
20 H

Opera
Cavalleria rusticana & Gianni Schicchi
Mascagni & Puccini
March 2024
Saturday
23 March
17 H

Recital
Cecilia Bartoli & Lang Lang
Sunday
24 March
15 H

Opera
Subscription Matinées
La Fille du régiment
Donizetti
Tuesday
26 March
20 H (Gala)

Opera
Subscription Galas
La Fille du régiment
Donizetti
Thursday
28 March
20 H

Opera
Subscription Soirées
La Fille du régiment
Donizetti
Saturday
30 March
20 H

Opera
La Fille du régiment
Donizetti
April 2024
Sunday
07 April
19 H

Staged Concert
Subscription Galas
Their Master’s Voice
Malkovich - Bartoli

Lloyd Webber The Phantom of the Opera

Musical
Saturday 16 December 2023 - 20 h (Gala)
Sunday 17 December 2023 - 15 h
Tuesday 19 December 2023 - 20 h
Wednesday 20 December 2023 - 20 h
Thursday 21 December 2023 - 20 h
Friday 22 December 2023 - 15 h
Friday 22 December 2023 - 20 h
Saturday 23 December 2023 - 15 h
Saturday 23 December 2023 - 20 h
Monday 25 December 2023 - 20 h
Tuesday 26 December 2023 - 15 h
Tuesday 26 December 2023 - 20 h
Wednesday 27 December 2023 - 15 h
Wednesday 27 December 2023 - 20 h
Friday 29 December 2023 - 15 h
Friday 29 December 2023 - 20 h
Saturday 30 December 2023 - 15 h
Saturday 30 December 2023 - 20 h
Sunday 31 December 2023 - 15 h
Sunday 31 December 2023 - 20 h (masquerade night)
Opéra de Monte-Carlo

Music by Andrew Lloyd Webber (born in 1948)
Libretto by Richard Stilgoe and Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on Gaston Leroux's novel Le Fantôme de l'Opéra
Lyrics by Richard Hart, additional lyrics by Richard Stilgoe
Orchestration by David Cullen and Andrew Lloyd Webber
Premiere: Her Majesty's Theatre, London, September 27, 1986

New production, in coproduction with Temple Live Entertainment Ltd. 
and Broadway Italia Srl, in agreement with The Really Useful Group

If we look at the worldwide success of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Phantom of the Opera, we might well ask ourselves why this musical, almost an opera, has never been performed in France. After more than 35 triumphant years and 160 million spectators, the time has come to put this right. Whose blood has never run cold when reading Gaston Leroux’s novel and his phantom, madly in love with Christine but who, when scorned, brings the chandelier crashing down on the audience at the Palais Garnier? French readers were the first to develop a passion for this tale full of mystery and dramatic turns of events. Hollywood then undertook to popularise it with many film adaptations. In the early 1980s, Andrew Lloyd Webber began to reflect upon this myth and adapted it for the stage. He wrote the score and the unforgettable songs that demand an extensive vocal range and agility, reminding us of the musical language of opera. The Opéra de Monte-Carlo, the only theatre designed by Charles Garnier, apart from the famous one in Paris where the action takes place, is delighted to host this new pro-duction of Phantom for a run of performances during the holiday season.

Vidéo

1 ©OMC - Simone Triacca
Production Team
Composer, book and orchestrations | Andrew Lloyd Webber
Lyrics | Charles Hart
Book & Additional Lyrics | Richard Stilgoe
Stage Director and Set Designer | Federico Bellone
Musical supervision | Giovanni Maria Lori
Choreography | Gillian Bruce
Co-set designer | Clara Abbruzzese
Costume, Hair & Make-up | Chiara Donato
Lighting design | Valerio Tiberi
Sound Designer | Roc Mateu
Illusions & Special Effects | Paolo Carta
Musical Director | Julio Awad
Backdrops designers & painters | Rinaldo Rinaldi & Maria Grazia Cervetti
Special Make-Up Artist | Roberto Mestroni
Associate director | Silvia Montesinos
Associate Choreographer | Marta Melchiorre
Associate Lighting Designer | Emanuele Agliati
Keyboard programming | Stuart Andrews
Cast
The Phantom | Ramin Karimloo
Christine Daaé | Amelia Milo
Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny | Vinny Coyle
Monsieur André | Earl Carpenter
Monsieur Firmin | Ian Mowat
Carlotta Giudicelli | Anna Corvino
Madame Giry | Alice Mistroni
Ubaldo Piangi | Gian Luca Pasolini
Meg Giry | Zoe Nochi
Buquet/Ensemble | Matt Bond
Monsieur Lefevre/Don Attilio/Ensemble | Jeremy Rose
Dance Captain/Ensemble | Mark Biocca
Jeweller/Ensemble | Nicola Ciulla
Hairdresser/Ensemble | Luca Gaudiano
Passarino/Ensemble | Antonio Orler
Confidant/Ensemble | Chiara Vergassola
Ensemble | Marianna Bonansone
Ensemble | Martina Cenere
Ensemble | Robert Ediogu
Ensemble | Stefania Fratepietro
Ensemble | Arianna Galletti
Ensemble | Jessica Lorusso
Ensemble/Christine Daaé (29/12) | Margherita Toso
Artists' biographies
Synopsis
From Broadway to the Opera

Andrew Lloyd Webber

Magically popular…

What is the secret of The Phantom’s undi-minished worldwide popularity? Whereas on Broadway a successful run of 13’981 perfor-mances came to an end after 35 years, a whole new generation has begun to discover this famous work. Supposedly, it was a even a hit on TikTok last Halloween... 

Magic certainly plays a role. Today, the produc-tion’s creators marvel at how easily everything seems to have fallen into place back in 1986. The discovery of Leroux’s book, finding out how to make it a good show, and creating the storyline, words, music, designs, choreography – each step followed the other so smoothly as happens rarely in a lifetime, and can certainly not be planned.

 

Passion, obsession and high romance

Librettist Richard Stilgoe explains that “if you have to pick a subject for a musical, there are certain rules… to make them work. Basically, what you have to get over with an audience is that moment when people start singing. So there has to be passion. And obsession. So that just words are not enough, and the song has to start. And The Phantom of the Opera is about one of the great obsessives in history.“ 

For Andrew Lloyd Webber, who sees himself as part of a team that collaborated wonderfully from the beginning, the key to its success are the element of romance together with the profound passion displayed by the main character: “At its heart, The Phantom of the Opera is a high romance. It was the depth of the love story which struck me when I came across the book while browsing in a little shop in New York. The score is intended to convey the reality of profound and deeply-held love.”

 

Well, opera, actually…

To opera buffs, and among them those fre-quenting Monaco’s Opera designed by Charles Garnier, this is no surprise: far more than the traditional traits of a musical, The Phantom of the Opera contains defining features of 19th century grand opera: a splendid setting, a powerful gothic story with impressive coups de théâtre, a practically symphonic score, melodramatic arias and passionate duets for charismatic soloists, even coloratura. 

This new production opens a fresh chapter in The Phantom’s history: it is the first at a suc-cessful opera house, and moreover in one of the only two ever designed by Charles Garnier. Surely the haughty phantom will be appeased when he sees that in Monte Carlo’s mild end-of-the-year climate the legend lives on.

The Paris Opera House by Andrew Lloyd Webber

Anyone familiar with a large opera house would testify that it is an extraordinary labyrinth of people and passageways, but the Paris Opera House of the last quarter of the 19th century, in which Gaston Leroux set The Phantom of the Opera, was remarkable by any standards. The huge building was constructed to designs by Charles Garnier from 1861 to 1875. It was a hotbed of politics and factions. From prima donna to stage-hand, the Opera House was governed by intrigue and rumour; everyone jostling for position, defending their own territory and scrabbling for new. At the time in which the novel is set, the Opera House boasted over 1,500 employees and had its own stables of white horses for the opera troupe. Today, it employs over 1,000 people and contains two permanent ballet schools within the building.

The Paris Opera House rose to pre-eminence in the 18th century. After the Revolution it was restored to its leading position in Paris by Napoleon in the reforms of 1807. Unquestionably among the most performed composers at that time was Salieri, whose music remained in the repertoire at the time of Leroux’s novel. Salieri had his greatest triumphs in Paris with Les Danaïdes (1787) and Tarare (1784). It is interesting that Mozart began to work with Da Ponte after the latter’s huge success with Salieri in France. Indeed, Mozart was not performed at the Paris Opera until the early 1800s and then only in a severely adapted form. Salieri was hailed as the natural successor to Gluck, the main force at the opera in the third quarter of the 18th century, and was greatly influenced by his music.

But perhaps it was Meyerbeer who reigned supreme. His grand operas were a masterful potpourri of components. His music was accessible, his characterisation brilliantly aided by his command of orchestration and he relished stage spectacle. This writer was chastened to learn that the 1849 production of Le Prophète was the first to feature rollerskating as a key ingredient and also introduced electric light as an effect. Indeed the Paris Opera always prided itself on its innovation. Aladdin (1822) by Isouard introduced gas lighting to the stage.

King of all this was the Opera’s chief designer Ciceri. Spectacle was all. Victor Hugo in his preface to Cromwell (1827) wrote ’The stage should make as complete as possible the illusion of reality’. The Paris Opera’s eruption of Vesuvius was legendary, employing real stones, and the titles of operas alone convey everything: Le Siège de Corinthe (Rossini), La Muette de Portici (Auber), Robert le Diable (Meyerbeer, noted for its Phantom of the Nuns effect) and, of course, Gounod’s Faust, the opera which is the backdrop to the Leroux novel. Key also to the Paris formula was the ballet. This was usually at the start of Act III. The gentlemen could dine before arriving at the theatre in time to see their various young ladies in the corps de ballet. Wagner’s Tannhäuser caused uproar with the Jockey Club because its ballet was placed too early in the production for their members’ convenience.

The Paris Opera House survives in much the same form described in the novel. It occupies a three-acre site and some idea of the labyrinthian nature of the building can be appreciated if one considers that the auditorium accounts for less than one fifth of the total space. There are over 17 storeys, seven of which are below the stage level; the stables for the opera horses still exist. There is a monument to La Carlotta. More important, there really is a lake underneath the building; it is an integral part of the design, and the water level acts as a ballast, raised or lowered, depending on the weight of the stage, seven storeys above it.

 

Andrew Lloyd Webber
Composer

Pratical information

How to get to the Opéra de Monte-Carlo?

 

BY train

The Principality of Monaco is served by several railway companies: SNCF TGV Grandes Lignes; TER SUD. Monte Carlo station is open every day from 5am to 2am. The Monte Carlo Opera is a 10-minute walk from the station (it is advised to use the upper exit).

BY CAR

To reach the Principality by car, it is advisable to take the A8 motorway, exit Monaco.
Casino car park: for afternoon performances, a flat rate of 5 € will be granted upon presentation of your opera tickets to the Monaco Parking agents. It is imperative to enter the car park between 2pm and 3.15pm in order to benefit from this special rate. (Non-contractual infor-mation, subject to government directives.)

HOW TO GET AROUND MONACO AND TO THE OPERA

The Compagnie des Autobus de Monaco serves the Monte Carlo Opera with routes 1, 5, 6 (Casino stop) and route 2 (Monte-Carlo or Tourist Office stops). The Principality can be covered on foot in less than an hour. To find out about the differ-ent walking routes leading to the Opera, please refer to the Monaco Malin guide available at the Tourist Office reception desk, located at the top of the Casino gardens.

Where to eat ?

Given the high demand during the holiday season, we recommend making your reservations in advance.

 

Café de Paris Monte-Carlo
Exclusive offer

Standing proudly on the Place du Casino, the Café de Paris Monte-Carlo is one of the legends of the Principality. An iconic brasserie which welcome you at any time of the day.

Upon presentation of your ticket for The Phantom of the Opera, you will be offered the daily special “aperitif”!

Opened everyday
From 8.00 am to 3.00 am
Last order : 00h45
Place du Casino
T. +377 98 06 76 23

MayaBay
Exclusive offer

Do you like Asian fusion cuisine?

On performance nights, Mayabay Monaco is adapting its opening hours to accommodate guests from Opera for late arrivals.

Open Monday to Saturday
From 12.00 to 1.30 am
Last order : 23h30
Closed on 24, 25 and 26 December
Special Night on 31 “Lantern Night
Le Rocabella, 24 avenue Princesse Grace
T. +377 97 70 74 67